ANOTHER PANDEMIC ?

ANOTHER PANDEMIC ?

ANOTHER PANDEMIC ?

They’ll never fall for this one, will they ?

Having just watched the Tour De France I have been bombarded by mindless commercials and apart
from the parasitic lawyers trying to get money from companies for nothing the vast majority of these
never ending ads are for “medical conditions” most of which the average human being has never
heard of. The latest in this long line of mystery illnesses that we all need a hospital full of expert
Doctors on hand to answer our dumb arsed questions is “Low T”……. now honestly is this yet another
joke?

It would appear that I’m surrounded by a world of sickly individuals who spend their entire life asking
their Doctor if some pill is “right for them” to control an illness they might not even have! The power of
brainwashing is quite unbelievable. It seems  that nobody can die from anything other than some
form of the big C, well maybe that is true, and as none of us are getting out of here alive, and true
medical science has moved on a bit, maybe any death has an element of Cancer related to it.

However, I have to ask myself whatever happened to dying of “natural causes” and “old age” or “heart
attacks” and “strokes”? It now seems the entire nation is petrified of cancer and we will all become
diabetics with high cholesterol and face the risk of heart attacks caused by illnesses we never knew we
had or experienced any symptoms. It seems the Medical world is dreaming up new illnesses every
week and of course creating a “pill” to ensure it’s “right for us” after yet again asking our personal
hospital full of Doctors.

Which one is right for you ? ………all of them!

Should you be unlucky enough to contract one of these mystery illnesses  the treatment and cure is
far worse than the “condition” encompassing such delights as nausea, dry mouth, dizziness, diarrhea,
headaches, loss of semen, anal leakage and of course one must never rule out DEATH!……..

Lets look at some of these ridiculous theoretical diseases and the “new pill” we should be taking;

FLOWMAX: The ad shows 4 overweight elderly golfers dashing off to the men’s room ……. any surprise
here? I would have thought if you drink a can of beer for each of the 18 holes sooner or later you are
going to have to pee!…….. treatment drink shorts or carry a hip flask!

BEANO: If you persist in eating beans, brussel sprouts, cabbage and other members of the brassica
family you will fart!  Remedy eat something else if you are going to be in company.

RESTATIS: Dry eye or the lack of ability to cry? Don’t be worried about being happy, you don’t have to
be miserable. Blink more often and don’t go out in the desert in windy conditions.

RESTLESS LEG SYNDROME: Are you serious??? If you have restless legs go for a WALK!

The Opposite of Restless Legs= PAD, tiredness of the legs after a long day, remedy sit down and put
your feet up!

NEW: Restless Arm Syndrome, coming soon from a medical company near you, the inability to stop
“Hi-Fiving” and other ridiculous gestures. Remedy stop watching mindless sport and wear a straight
jacket.

I wonder what is coming next? Another variety of flu no doubt, we have had birds and farm animals
perhaps something from the oceans, how about Whale Flu or The Dolphin Syndrome where we “click”
as we sneeze?

Definitely “Clicking”

On a more serious note there are a couple of them out there which I discovered when I asked “A”
Doctor. Sorry I don’t have one of my own so I had to get my questions in while he was on break. My old
Doctor, when I was in the Royal Air Force generally prescribed the same medication and after
reviewing the symptoms would usually say “In a case like this my son, my advise to you is drink
heavily”

The first of these diseases and ailments that I appear to have been suffering from all my life has no
known cure it is called ANDRENALITIS, the thrill of being alive and normal and getting a thrill from
DOING things!!! This can be as wacky as enjoying life, your job, careering around in a fighter jet, being
in love with your wife and family, looking forward to a good steak (to hell with cholesterol, we are MEAT
eaters) enjoying sports, sex, gardening, eating, fine wines and drinking, fast cars, skiing, motor sports,
rugby and when tired, very strangely enjoying a good nights sleep. As the Doctor said at best you can
expect a long and happy life, at worst you will kill yourself!

And finally the one that seems to be bugging me the older I get, TRIALITIS VULGARIS. The fear of not
riding the common Sunday Trial. Yes, my friends this is a real “Biggey” and I’m told will not go away
despite several attempts at retirement it just keeps coming back. The more time you spend away from
it the worse it gets. So what is this terrible affliction? What are the symptoms? and if there is no known
cure what remedies are there available to mitigate the problems.

Of course like most diseases it is possible to contract it but for the most part I believe it is Hereditary
and I would use the Lampkin family as a classic case in point. Theirs of course is classed as “Chronic”
and even the youngest Lampkin is already smitten with the bug and may well go the same way as his
father and grandfather before him, not to mention uncles and other members of the family who are
riddled with this most complex affliction.

1950 and my father, Frank Down on the Norton

My Uncle and Godfather, Tom Arter

It used to be that none of the symptoms were present until the age of around 7 when sometimes a
young child was hauled round to a Pub car park or village sports ground where anything up to 200 other
sufferers could be seen on a Sunday morning wearing isolation suits of grab green waxed cotton and
flat caps marking them as other “no-hoper’s” or “terminal”. By the time the poor child had been
transported down muddy lanes, through rock strew gorges, across bleak grassy hillsides and through
woods filled with bottomless mud holes the first symptoms were already apparent. Persistent exposure
during rain and snow across the winter months meant that by puberty the afflicted child was now
begging to have one of these strange machines before his or her 16th birthday. As they say from that
point on the rest is history.

16, on the  1961 Greeves Scottish (1962)

There may be brief respites from the disease during life but it usually comes back to haunt the patient
sometimes manifesting itself in the form of “section dreaming” where the TRIALITIS sufferer finds
themselves gazing at hillsides while driving, visualizing Begins and Ends cards where others just see
trees and rocks. At other times, while walking with children and dogs the sufferer sees the same white
markers in river beds and flowing water noting steps, hazards and recovery zones. This can sometimes
be distracting at a friends garden party where the afflicted find themselves planning a route through
their neighbor’s rockery and fish pool.

Other symptoms, during a period of enforced inactivity, can be when the patient goes missing for 1
hour periods and can usually be found in the workshop aimlessly looking at the machine and changing
components for no apparent reasons. Polishing pieces of bright alloy may also be noted during this
stage. Other addictions may be evident with continual computer visits to Trials Central and the Todo
Trials website.

More mindless polishing

After much clinical research it seems the only way to ease the patient’s suffering is to actually go to an
event and ride.The ideal cure is at least one trial to be taken every 2 weeks, usually after breakfast. It
should be noted that after the event the sufferer will spend long periods of silence on the drive home
as he relives every loop on a section by section basis, looking to see where lost marks and unforced
errors could have been saved.

47 years later, still suffering from the “Bug”

So for those of you also afflicted I HAVE asked my DOCTOR and he has prescribed 2 days at
Cotopaxi at the end of August and then 3 days in Casper Wyoming the following weekend, we wait to
see if there is any improvement in the patient’s condition.

“Doctor  I’m very worried about him, he is out in the garden going round
and round in figure 8’s and won’t come in for his supper”

My advise is “Drink Heavily!”

TONY DOWN

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4 WEEKS TO GO

 

4 WEEKS TO GO

4 WEEKS TO GO

With just over 4 weeks to go until the quest begins in earnest again after the long enforced layoff I’m
getting excited and keen all over again, no matter how old you are the “Trials Bug” is one of those
bugs/viruses that will never go away.  Cabin fever struck this morning and the Cub was dragged out for
a little very light practice and as always it performed flawlessly. One month and the action starts again
with the search for 2 more wins in Classic Expert.

Following the “ruling” whereby you can enter both Classic and Premier Lightweight, but NOT Premier
Heavyweight I might just have a go at both for Cotopaxi at the end of August and see if I can start
racking up some points in Prem Lightweight to catch up with Len Sims, as he has been having it all
his own way in the class whether he has ridden it or not.

From the remaining rounds I just have enough, I think, with a double header at Cotopaxi, the 3 day
event at Casper, and then whatever happens at Sandia or Bull Hollow and the final ride at Hollister.
A tall order with only 7 events and no spare day to cover the “off” performance. Just heard that Sandia is
now officially canceled and that AHRMA is not keen on putting on a substitute despite the fact that we
HAVE a venue suitable for trials and motorcross and we have helpers ready to lay it out,!!! and all this
after their insistence that there MUST be a replacement  for the lost AMA venue which only resulted in
12 entries!!! Another sure fired loser is the Aonia Pass event, which never gets much by way of turnout,
and has now become an even bigger disaster by being a 2 day. I can never really understand why we
don’t concentrate on those venues that traditionally have a great turnout and do more for the
membership in those areas, Chehalis and the North West being a classic in point. Too far for me to
go and I didn’t really enjoy the event but it has a great turnout and surely there must be other venues
in the area that could put on a 2 day ? Better be quiet or I will find there will be another obscure rule
and I will lose all THIS year’s Championship points as well.

Back to the theme then, Tucker Ranch at Cotopaxi, another superb location in the Arkansas Valley with
all manner of trials terrain in every direction including the landscaping of “Wehling Falls” in the start
area. This has made some excellent sections in our past two visits and I’m sure will find it’s way back
in again this year.

Wehling Falls at the start, must look fantastic when its running

The first year we rode Cotopaxi I was breaking in  the Cub and had only just perfected the front fork
set up but was still struggling with carburation and footrest position. I can remember having to ride
with “tick over” which I dislike, having had 2 feet on the rest 5’s when the motor just wouldn’t pick up
and stalled. However, that has all been sorted to my satisfaction so any problems now are rider
created only.

Although I won both days last year my overall performance was less than stellar with a hand full of
crunching 5’s on day 2. A 5 on the first section on the first 2 loops does little for the ego, and then an
almighty crash on section 5 on the third loop after 2 very smooth cleans puts trials in perspective.

Two cleans here before the almighty Crash

2007 had fairly open sections which, were all very fair, doable and classic 60-70’s vintage sections.
Last year particularly day 2 was a little ambitious with bigger than usual steps and a lot of very, very
tight turns which in some cases meant having to use that wretched clutch thing to get round the
corners. Whoever set them out might just do it again so I’d better do some ultra tight turns in the drive
with that clutch thingey!

Now that’s a tight turn!

One week later and we head off for Casper which is near idyllic in terms of trials country with everything
on tap from rivers, deep mud, rocks, fallen trees, old ruins in the woods, and the lego land blocks at the
start. Another one of those venues that I love but one that I never seem to deliver my best rides at for
some reason. Last year it was Enfield time riding the PI line which in all honesty was very easy and I
only lost 1 mark in the 3 days of trialing. Although I’ll take the Enfield I rather suspect I will just ride the
Cub this year as it such a delight to ride and I might need a good ride there to cement the Classic
Championship. I really hope Dan puts the muddy “cow pat/bubbling spring” sections back in and there
must be 3 or 4 usable mud holes on that hill which can sort out skill from pot luck.

The muddy hillside, which if kept tight could be a real test

More mud & rivers at Casper

I’ll keep pushing Ed to get Bull Hollow on the cards as I rate this area as being pretty good for all our
vintage machines and should be included after the cancellation of Sandia for both Trials and
Motocross.

Some great sections at Bull Hollow

The Ahrma explanation as to the cancellation of the event at Sandia leaves me wondering as to what is
happening there. Over the years that I’ve ridden there I’ve seen a steady increase in the number of
entries and the quality of the event. Initially in its first year it was a series of sandy sections around the
cross country course and on arrival at the venue it was difficult to imagine where a trial could be run. For
the last 2 years we were lucky to be able to use some more adventurous terrain behind the landfill where
some good sections could be found to challenge both modern and vintage bikes. From a personal
perspective the start area was always a sea of motocross bikes and I’m amazed that it has been
canceled for any reason other than lack of volunteers to run it. Again on a personal note it was good to
see long time friend Mick Andrews there last year and an even greater pleasure to see him riding my
Glitzmobile.

Mick Andrews aboard “Superglitz”

Last time out for the Enfield on the PI line, Sandia

Finally, and again funds might not stretch that far, but Hollister and a run through Napa wraps up the
season. Hollister again tends to be on the easier side and a single dab can result in a second place
so another of those events where timing at the section and a lot of concentration is required as an “off ”
section can ruin the whole day.

TONY DOWN

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  • 8/1/2009 2:07 AM Duncan MacRae wrote:
    Hi there,
    I know its over a year old but I saw an awesome looking Yamaha majesty 320 on your site, is it still for sale? I would LOVE to buy it…I collect Majesty’s!! Or any other’s you have!

    Thanks!!
    Reply to this

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GET A GRIP!

GET A GRIP!

GET A GRIP !

Following the “Of Bars & Men” article the same reader asked for a little guidance and reccomendations
on the subject of grips.

Well I’m not talking arm wrestling here, although I don’t lose many left handed competitions, I’m talking
trials riding handlebar grips and the ways to fit them. Personally my favorites for grip and feel are the
Doherty soft black ribbed variety and the Renthal soft diamond in grey. I have used many others over the
years and in truth there probably isn’t much to chose between them but when I fit new grips I usually
drift back to those two types.

The “new” Dohertys


Renthal Grey soft diamond

The Doherty soft black ribbed rubber ones were always fitted to all my bikes when I was a young lad
but they did have some drawbacks in so much that the rubber was so soft, and bearing in mind we
seldom wore gloves, when you finished a day’s riding in something like the Scottish Six Days then the
palms of your hands were as black as a coalminer’s and it took forever to scrub them clean. The newer
ones must have some sort of additive as I haven’t experienced those joys of late.

So, the “Do’s & Don’t’s” of grips, …….. you may feel you can save a pair by carefully rolling them off but
in all honesty for all the problems you will later encounter it just isn’t worth it to save $10.00.  So use a
blade and cut them off and then clean the bars and the twistgrip before fitting the new ones. In days of
yore we would use a splash of straight petrol and just slide them on having shaken the excess gas
out. Left to dry naturally they would hold well on the bars without any glue, but beware here using a
pre-mix as even the smallest part of oil will eventually cause them to rotate and in the worst case
scenario will pull off when least expected!

Over the years I’ve seen all manner of “shade tree’s” attempts to firm up rotating grips with all sorts
of tape from the old black insulating style to the modern electrical shiny plastics. One word here …..
DON’T! It might last an event but will then become a soft gooey mess.

Other methods of getting them on and snug can include a small splash of alcohol to ease the
sliding on and then gentle use of the hair dryer until they firm up but if you want that dummy grip to
slide on nicely then use the Renthal Grip Glue, and use a thin rib of it top and bottom of the bar then
slide the grip into place. As you slide it on some of the glue will seep out so wipe it off before it dries.
On the throttle side the bigger grip will usually slide on over most modern throttles which have a
ribbing in the plastic and I don’t usually need to use any glue on this side, but do make sure the end
of the grip does not bind on the throttle body.

The best of the modern glues

As a general rule I would change the grips every 2 years or so providing they have not sustained
any accident damage.

TONY DOWN

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RODIN AND THE FOUNTAIN

 

RODIN AND THE FOUNTAIN

RODIN AND THE FOUNTAIN

Just when I thought it was safe to go fishing again and with all current projects completed a new one
appears with the time frame of … must be complete before 2nd of August!

Her Ladyship desires a fountain in her shade garden to match the rustic stockade raised bed. Initially
a hole was to be drilled all the way through a 2′ long log???????……. then having pumped the water up
there from a left over pool pump it is somehow magically to descend making suitable splashing and
gurgling noises on its way back to the retaining pond.

Rodin sits pensively in the shade garden and ponders how this will be possible? Many beers later a
plan is devised which may be a little ambitious but time to give it a go.

How the hell am I going to build this?

The game begins placing three large logs upright and drawing some retention areas in the tops of
same and then cutting exit paths for the water. A suitable large retaining horse feeder is acquired as
the main pond and after hacking through some more tree roots I have a level base for the unit in an
area that pleases the eye. Using the wood chisels and a mallet, last used in 1993 in Saudi carving a
huge sign for the ladies craft shop, work begins and by nightfall I’m surrounded by wood chips. Enough
is enough and so the next day dawns with the final carving and honing of the retention pools in the logs
….. I’m now covered in sawdust from all the high speed sanding but at this stage it looks like it will work
as long as I fill all the minor cracks in the wood with some clear silicone. Needless to say all my clear
silicone has gone so off for another tube and the job looks like it will work as its aquarium silicone so
it should do the waterproofing.

Covered in sawdust, smoothing the retention basins in the logs

Now for a test firing and after rediscovering Archimedes principle I now remember I can only submerge
logs in water so far or they will pop up, thanks Arch! With some water pumped out and the upright logs
positioned time to see where the water will go. Well it goes where I want it but not effectively enough so
build a few test chutes out of Renolds tin foil and that gets the effect I’m looking for but now I need to
change the chute material to bamboo. Bamboo used to be a fairly common cheap wood when I was a
lad but now it seems to be as rare as RHS! Eventually I end up buying a Tikki Lamp as it has the right
sized bamboo handle so I’ll remove a few inches and cut and shape them to fit.

Phase 1 of the design with metal foil chutes

As yesterday was “pool & party” day and we were on a roll playing 14 games for the loss of only 3, the
party continued long into the evening where much ale was consumed and today has been somewhat
of a wooly day with zero interest for hand crafting anything other than a cup of coffee.

Another day and it all comes together and I can establish some levels and set the spouts in the logs.
Very quickly the project takes shape and the another “test firing” is done with acceptable splashing
and gurgling noises. The pump pipe is positioned and screwed into place along with a large wooden
backing plate to stop the thing moving around.

Phase 2 with the Bamboo chutes, and all level!

3 wheelbarrows of rocks later and several beers, well is was pretty hot today, and with washed rocks
the final decorative building can be done finishing off with some nice smooth flat river rocks as the
edging for the pool. Well you either like pools and fountains or you don’t but what started as a daunting
project went together pretty well in my opinion, and once again it has won prizes!

Rocks in place, almost there!

It needs a few extra touches……. coming soon

NOW CAN I GO FISHING???

Finally just those important finishing details, so with Brenda’s extra “freebie plants” from our local
nursery a few extras to grace the new addition ……. and there are still some left over Frogs from our
old Arizona pool complex so maybe they will make an appearance over the next few days.

Some extra plants, rocks and the duty frogs

The beauty of running water, even if you can’t hear the gurgling and
splashing

TONY DOWN

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BACK ON THE BEEMER

 

BACK ON THE BEEMER

BACK ON THE BEEMER

All cleaned up and ready for DMV

After many moons languishing in the workshop, a lot of crying, and now being the last road going
machine in the inventory the giant K1200LT once more is on the roads. Once again this involved
many things, not least building a ramp to get 850lbs of bike out of the workshop where it has sat
since January when it was unceremonially  humped and pushed into same by the Mexican army of
forest workers before we departed for AZ Cycle Park and the Buckeye 2 Day Trial in early February.

Must be the weather, or the completion of other projects but no sooner had Madam got a bee in her
bonnet re riding than the tirade is non stop until same is achieved. With plenty of wood from park
benches available a suitable ramp was devised, cross braced to support around 1100 lbs, and
constructed. With the Beemer rolled out in the sunshine time for a little spit and polish and then off to
Cortez to play the DMV game again.

New Ramp project complete!

First stop the Ford dealership to get the VIN verification form, each DMV has its own rules!, and then
back to the County Clerk’s offices to register for Colorado. No queues here or take a number so
straight in ask for what you want and lo…… plate and title and $60 a year cheaper than Arizona.

Road legal again

Plates on and road legal once more off to Mancos and the Columbine where surprize, surprize Jim
and Lucille are already in full pool mode. Lucille is banging them in, 4 in a row, as I watch and then
when its her go again finishes off the last one and then the 8 ball.

86, and still on a roll having shot 4!

Happiness is a ride on a Beemer

All too soon time to leave and enjoy the fast twisters on the way back to Dolores. Real fun ride on the
impeccably behaved Beemer and the only incident to recall was passing a sherrif going the other
way as we crested a brow at around the 80+ mark……. he didn’t turn round so the day finished without
incident

Leaving Mancos and into the fast sweepers

A Great “Rider’s Road”

One of my favorites

Another project complete so very soon I can get on and rebuild the Baby Superglitz TY175 and get
her sold along with the much beloved “No 53” SSDT replica.

TONY DOWN

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OF BARS AND MEN

 

OF BARS AND MEN

OF BARS AND MEN

Another Bar

Immediately bars are mentioned the mind fills with all manner of beverages, banter, foaming pints and
other things. However, a reader has asked me to write an article, as I currently have plenty of downtime,
on the subject of handlebars and general set up for Vintage bikes.

Over the years there have been many changes in style, position, shape and construction, from the
almost flat wide steel bars of the 60’s and 70’s, the transition to the hi-lift alloy Renthals, then the
addition of the cross brace and now the fat bars with a lower rise on just about all modern machines.

1963 and flat as a pancake bars on the Greeves 24 TES

So there are many factors that determine how you set your bars and levers and I’ll try and spell them
out and go for the “average setting” from which the reader can then use as a datum and adjust
accordingly to what suits him or her best. Perhaps we should look at all the other factors that also
contribute to the overall set up and final positioning of the handlebars.

Riding posture is a key so using the bike’s 4 shocks and the human body’s other 4 of elbows and
knees the perfect posture should incorporate all of these and the rider should be in a classic “banana”
bend when standing on the rests.

The classic “Banana Bend” and “8” shocks all working

Over the years the position of footrests have changed going from solid weld ons which were usually
too far forward as trials bikes were originally transformed road bikes, through the spring loaded style
which invariably got mounted too high up causing the rider to have his center of gravity too high up and
thus weight too far forward. Currently it would seem the ideal position for footrests is about 12 inches
high and on a line with the leading edge of the rear tire. Generally speaking, irrespective of the type
of fork being used, or the offset of the top yoke the distance from the center of the front spindle to
center of the footrest should be 37.5 inches. Further back and the front wheel will lift too easily and
may become difficult to hold down on long uphill climbs, too much further forward and the machine
will be difficult to control in tight turns and steep downhills as the rider’s weight will be too far forward
and over the front wheel causing plowing in turns and the classic “A over T” on downhills.

Repositioned pegs on the Cub,  2″ down and 2″ back

Taking the shape of the bars into account the best type of bars to replace old bent steel bars from the
70’s must be the Renthal 5.5 or 6.5 inch lift with crossbrace in light alloy. Personally at 5′ 10″ I prefer
the 6.5 lift for most machines with 29.5 inch fork legs. The Enfield however has 31.25 inch legs and I
have therefore gone for a lower lift set up here to compensate for the longer legs.

Standard Renthals with crossbrace

Lower lift Hebo bars to compensate for the long legs of the Enfield, and
yes they go all the way to the top!

As a general rule the “bend” of the bars should be parallel to the fork leg. Rotating the bars forward
will give quicker steering as per the current model machines, but on older bikes may well put too
much weight on the front wheel. So start parallel to the forks then try a few degrees forward anywhere
up to vertical relative to the ground.

OEM bars set at the “Datum” on my 74 SSDT replica

Unbraced wide Renthals set a few degrees forward from the “Datum” on
my “No Excuses Cub”

Moving on to levers, and lets discuss what normally goes wrong here……… over tightening!!! Levers
should be adjusted on the bars such that they can just be moved with finger pressure and this will save
countless replacements which either snap half way along or through the “perch” whenever the bike is
dropped. To get the best out of your levers set them such that they are an extension of your forearm,
thus if it were a road bike you would set them around 5-15 degrees from the horizontal. However, as
most of the time you will be standing on the pegs set them around 15-30 down from the horizontal in
a position where they naturally come to hand.

Levers become an extension of your forearm

While on the subject of levers some of my favorites are Magura for the front brake and  Works
Connection or Moose for the clutch which have needle roller bearings in the pivot point and make for
a silky smooth operation if you must use the clutch!!! Remember older Vintage Trials bikes were NOT
intended to be ridden using the clutch under ANY circumstances as traction was achieved using
throttle control and the flywheel.

Good quality front brake lever by Magura

A clever clutch lever from Works Connection with needle roller bearings

Another needle roller clutch lever by Moose

Clearly that must bring us to the Throttle and here I would use Domino which has the 90 degree pull.
They come with 2 choices of action either fast or slow, the color of the barrel indicating which is which.
Black = Slow and White = Fast and generally speaking the slow action would be the best bet for a
Novice rider or anyone using an older 4 Stroke which has an Amal carb fitted. Amal make throttles of
a similar design but I find the barrel length too small for the span of my hand.

Neat and simple throttle from Domino

If you are using OEM throttles from the 60’s and 70’s these required longer cables as the entry point
into the throttle mechanism was at 90 degrees to the bar. If you plan on using this type then about a
45-70 degree upward position was the best and a fair amount of electrician’s tape was used to give
some form of rigidity to prevent winter tree branches from catching under the cable and giving you an
unexpected burst of power. When setting up the throttle cable many of “us” older riders prefer Zero
tickover and indeed a little slack before any take up which allows the flywheel to have its full
capabilities and also allows very slow tight cornering without any use of that clutch thing!

Irrespective of what throttle that is being used always make sure the end of the rubber is not fouling
the bar and again don’t over tighten for the same reason as discussed under levers. Should you drop
the bike on the right side then always check the throttle operation before restarting and adjust
accordingly.

Decompressors, where fitted, serve multiple purposes ranging from a kill switch on older bikes, and
an excellent form of braking on bikes with very poor brakes like the Ossa. Most of the older Doherty or
Amal levers are pretty crude and have a large mounting platform which can get in the way of the clutch
but Domino produce a neat unit or Works Connection have an excellent integrated control mounted
on the clutch lever as I use on the Enfield.

Clutch and Decompressor all in one unit

Works Connection integrated unit as used on my Enfield

Finally while doing all this work on set up make sure you have “good” cable runs and those that move
are positioned in the correct sequence with the front brake cable usually forward of the others and free
to move with the compression and extension of the forks. Keep the clutch cable in the smoothest
flowing direction to avoid any tight bends, and finally turn the bars on full lock in both directions to ensure
no binding or sudden acceleration from the throttle.

A lot of cables and controls

Simple layout on the Cub

Well there are some views and tips for the “new to vintage trials” readers, try them, see how they feel
and then adjust accordingly for your own personal preference.

TONY DOWN

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Comments
  • 8/21/2009 4:36 PM Don Hale wrote:
    Tony – I stumbled on your website – very interesting. I’m new to trials and would like some tips on setting up the bars on my 1978 199 350 Sherpa T. Some of the terms you are using are unfamilar to me. I was wondering if I could call you and talk on the phone. If that’s all right send me you tele. number and the best time to call Thanks Don Hale.
    Reply to this
  • 5/23/2011 7:37 PM Mike Austin wrote:
    as a new old guy to trials I found the information very valuable, I will be following your website closely.
    Thanks: Mike Austin (1968 Greeves Wessex)
    Reply to this
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